01

It's a fact of life for many of us. Are you making the most of your commute?

Ultimate Guide to Commuting | CarMax
People who work away from home all share a common daily grind — the commute. Whether you love commuting or detest it, hopping in the car and driving to work is an accepted part of life. But is your commute the best it can be?
Ultimate Guide to Commuting Infographic Teaser | CarMax

This guide sheds light on some of the best commuting methods and information. We’ll dive into four distinct sections: 

Awarding a vehicle the title of “ultimate commuter car” is a tough call. Cities and states have their own unique characteristics which affect the types of cars people own and the qualities those cars should have to be effective commuter cars. If you’re a construction foreman in Indiana, you’ll likely want a different daily commuter car than an engineer in California or a student in Texas. We’ve tried to accommodate these differences in a list of 10 recommendations for the most popular commuting cars across the nation.

02

The Most Popular Commuter Cars

SEDANS

Honda Civic

MPG: Up to 35 MPG mixed city/highway for gasoline; 40-50% higher with the hybrid engine

The Honda Civic is on nearly every best commuter car list (including our own best hybrid cars list) for excellent reasons — which includes its amazing fuel economy for city and highway driving. This popular car also has a roomy, comfortable cabin with high-end materials that complement its balanced and responsive handling. Newer models also offer plenty of commuter-friendly features, such as Bluetooth®, automatic climate control, full power accessories, blind spot monitoring, and adaptive cruise control. If you’re looking for a well-equipped, affordable sedan for your daily commute, you’ll be hard-pressed to find a car more up to the task than the Civic.

Nissan Altima

MPG: Up to 34 MPG mixed city/highway

Besides its great fuel economy and comfortable ride, why buy an Altima? It’s always one of the most popular sedans on the road, and it brings many commuter-friendly features along for the drive. Newer models include a roomy interior, HID headlights, a smartphone-ready sound system, heated and powered seats, and a lane-departure warning system. The Altima has also been praised for having great brakes, a feature many commuters might overlook until they find themselves stuck in stop-and-go traffic.

Honda Accord

MPG: Up to 31 MPG mixed city/highway for gasoline; up to 48 MPG for hybrid

The Honda Accord makes our list as a popular commuter car that nearly anybody would be happy to drive. The Accord has earned a reputation for being roomy and comfortable, and it performs equally well on highways and city streets. The Accord’s high gas mileage and well-equipped cabin make this sedan an enjoyable commuter car. It’s also easy to drive, thanks to its great handling and ample outward visibility. Newer models have plenty of commuter-friendly features too, including hands-free audio controls, a touchscreen infotainment center, automatic climate control, and adaptive cruise control.

Toyota Camry

MPG: Up to 28MPG mixed city/highway for gasoline; up to 41 MPG for hybrid

Since its debut in 1983, the Toyota Camry has been one of the most popular midsized family sedans for commuters. This sedan gives its owners great gas mileage (the Camry Hybrid gets even better mileage), a comfortable ride, and admirable interior design. The interior is roomy, with comfortable and spacious seats, and boasts excellent outward visibility. The Camry also has a quiet and smooth enough ride to rival some entry-level luxury sedans. Many Camrys are equipped with a modest set of features that are still ahead of their time, and newer models have great commuter-friendly options, including hands-free audio controls, blind-spot monitoring, a tilting-and-telescoping steering wheel, power accessories, and a responsive infotainment system.

Hyundai Elantra

MPG: Up to 36 MPG mixed city/highway

The Hyundai Elantra is an affordable sedan known for its simplicity and its high gas mileage. In fact, it on our list of 10 cars that get great gas mileage. The Elantra has all the features that daily commuters could want in a car, including plenty of interior space, intuitive controls, and responsive handling. The Elantra’s spacious cabin is similar to most other cars in its class, and the interior build materials give the cockpit a refined, classy look. Ride quality has improved in recent years, and the newer models are quite quiet on the highway. Upgraded trims also offer commuter-friendly features like blind-spot monitoring with rear cross-traffic alert, heated front seats, hands-free audio, and dual-zone automatic climate control.

SUVS

Honda CR-V

MPG: Up to 31 MPG mixed city/highway

The Honda CR-V is one of the most popular crossover SUVs available today, and it’s an excellent, practical option for commuters who are traveling with their family or who use their weekends to explore the outdoors. The CR-V squeezes lots of miles from a gallon of gas, and newer models also have a push-button economy mode that maximizes your fuel economy by serving up a more modulated driving experience. It’s available with all-wheel drive, for extra confidence on the road in lots of different driving conditions. The spacious CR-V rides comfortably, is relatively quiet at highway speeds, and offers solid handling. Newer models have a modern interior design, spacious seats, premium hands-free sound systems, lane departure warning, and adaptive cruise control.

Chevrolet Equinox

MPG: Up to 28 MPG mixed city/highway

The Chevrolet Equinox is one of our top SUVs for a number of reasons. It offers its owners a refined style with plenty of functionality and comfort. It gets adequate gas mileage and there’s an abundance of legroom for backseat passengers. The handling is respectable and comfortable in newer models, and there’s optional all-wheel drive, plus the Equinox is quiet at highway speeds. In case your commute needs a bit more power, you could opt for the V6-engined Equinox, which offers a notable performance boost over the standard 4-cylinder engine. Upgraded trims from newer models have several commuter-friendly features which include Bluetooth, a lane departure warning system, and automatic climate control.

Ford Escape

MPG: Up to 25 MPG mixed city/highway

The Ford Escape is a popular and robust crossover SUV that has responsive handling, a fairly smooth ride and a quiet, comfortable cabin. The Escape gets great gas mileage and has a streamlined interior and exterior, plus many modern features commuters will love. Drivers who like having extra power on tap without sacrificing higher gas mileage will be happy to know there’s also a turbocharged Escape. Newer models are equipped with Bluetooth and have power outlets for phones and tablets, power accessories, blind-spot mirrors, and a forward collision warning system.

GMC Terrain

MPG: Up to 31 MPG mixed city/highway

The GMC Terrain is a compact crossover SUV that’s mechanically similar to the Chevrolet Equinox. The Terrain has a stylish cabin, ample standard features, refined handling, and a smooth ride. Its cabin is surprisingly quiet at highway speeds and it’s well built and gets high marks for fuel economy. The ample list of standard features includes a tilting-and-telescoping steering wheel, satellite radio, and hands-free Bluetooth phone and audio connectivity. Newer models also include automatic climate control, blind-spot monitoring, and a lane-departure warning system.

Nissan Juke

MPG: Up to 29 MPG mixed city/highway

The Nissan Juke is rather unique among smaller SUVs. It has a polarizing design, inside and out; no other crossover SUV or small hatchback even comes close to looking quite like the Juke. Whether you love or hate the design, it’s indisputable that the Juke makes a great commuter car. Some owners even think it’s a good choice as a romantic getaway car for weekend trips. The Juke has a peppy engine, sharp handling, and a sporty suspension. Plus, thanks in part to its continuously-variable transmission (CVT), the Juke get good gas mileage for an SUV. The interior isn’t cavernous, but the seats are comfortable and designed for enthusiastic driving. The Juke also comes with Bluetooth and a hands-free texting assistant to help keep you focused on the road. 

If you’re considering a great commuter car that didn’t make our list, don’t worry! There are plenty of options, depending on your particular commuting needs. Just keep these attributes in mind during your search: comfort, fuel economy, and modern technology. Read on for details.

03

The Best Qualities of a Commuter Car

Car comfort

The average American spends nearly 50 minutes in the car each day — more than 200 hours in the car each year, not including weekends! When you spend this much time driving, the comfort of your car plays a big role in keeping your daily commute pleasant. Here are a few qualities to consider when you’re looking for a great car for commuting:

Power seats

You should be able to adjust your seat’s height and distance not just from the steering wheel, but from the foot pedals too. Power controls can fine-tune exactly where you want your seat to be, and height-adjustable lumbar support, if available, can provide extra support for your lower back. A well-tweaked seat position maximizes your comfort and your field-of-vision, too. 

See Proper Driving Posture for tips on how to best adjust your seat.

Adjust your reach

Seat comfort is just the beginning. Consider a vehicle with a telescoping steering wheel and adjustable pedals to make driving less arduous. Your arms should bend slightly at the elbow so you can make turns without straining to reach or hunching over the wheel. Adjustable pedals are a boon for people who struggle with being a little shorter than average.

Heated and cooled seats

Ultimate Guide to Commuting | CarMax
Cush your tush with built-in heated and cooled seats to improve your commute during frigid winters and sweltering summers. Heated seats are also great for drivers and passengers who struggle with back pain. In addition, consider a heated steering wheel, which offers soothing relief after you finish scraping the morning frost from your windshield.

Automatic climate control

Automatic climate control, also known as dual-zone climate control, lets the driver and passengers adjust their own heat and air-conditioning without interrupting another person’s comfort. The systems use sensors to automatically adjust different parts of the cabin to keep everybody comfortable. Newer car models even let you specify the exact temperature for your side of the cabin. If you carpool, then this is a must-have feature.

A smooth, quiet ride

How a car drives is a crucial comfort factor. You’ll want a car that mutes external noise, dulls vibrations, and has good handling. These factors help absorb wind noise and make bumpy roads more bearable. A softly sprung suspension offers the most comfortable ride, but at the cost of handling. A firm, sporty suspension provides plenty of sharp handling, but the ride isn’t as comfortable. Most cars fall somewhere in between.  

Fuel efficiency

Ultimate Guide to Commuting | CarMax
Commuters cover approximately 29.2 miles per day. That’s 7,592 miles in one year! So, if you want to save yourself from spending too much time and money at the gas pump, invest in a commuter vehicle that gets at least 22 miles to the gallon.

Modern technology

Ultimate Guide to Commuting | CarMax
Modern technology can help with everything from recognizing gridlock traffic to preventing accidents. Here are the top five technological features that can improve your commute.

Forward-collision warning 

Forward-collision warning systems significantly reduce the chances of you rear-ending another vehicle. When you’re trying to change lanes in bumper-to-bumper traffic and the person in front of you suddenly slams on the brakes, a system that uses cameras, lasers, or radar calculates the potential of an accident, provides warnings for you to prevent a collision, and then uses automatic emergency braking to stop your car before a crash can happen — just in case you don’t react in time to prevent the accident. Some forward-collision warning systems are more autonomous and also alert you when a pedestrian or cyclist might move in front of your car.  

Blind-spot monitoring 

Blind-spot monitoring uses lasers, cameras, or radar to monitor where nearby vehicles are in relation to your “blind spots,” or the places your mirrors don’t show. If there’s a car in a blind spot, the system turns on a warning light in the side mirrors. If you ignore the warning signal and still try to merge into the path of another car, the system emits an alert or chime to tell you a car is in the way.

Voice controls 

Voice controls are a must-have option for hands-free, or if you want to control your car’s entertainment system while keeping your attention on the road. It’s also possible to have your phone read incoming text messages out loud and accept dictated responses.

Steering wheel-mounted stereo controls

Right alongside voice controls are steering wheel-mounted stereo controls, which let you adjust your music or calls on the fly and without taking your eyes off the road.

Android Auto and Apple CarPlay

The days of cassette tapes and CD players are long gone. Instead there’s Android Auto™ and Apple CarPlay™, which synch your car’s infotainment system with your phone’s interface. It also incorporates your phone’s usability and features, so your phone instantly becomes car-friendly and voice-activated.  
04

Commuting Statistics by State

Now that we’ve broken down some of the features that make a great commuter car, let’s dive into a list that shows some of the experiences that commuters in each state can expect to encounter on their daily drive. You’ll also find the average commute times for three of the most populous cities in each state. Click below for more information on your state.

Click on your state below to jump there.

Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Alabama | CarMax

Alabama

Car ownership per household in Alabama is slightly lower than the national average for owning one car or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for three or more cars.

  • 2 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 20.2 percent have one vehicle
  • 40.6 percent have two cars
  • 23.3 percent have three cars
  • 13.9 percent of Alabama households have four or more cars

Statewide, Alabama workers have an average daily commute time of 23.6 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.8 percent of Alabama workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 85.9 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 8.6 percent of the Alabama workforce carpool
  • 1.1 percent walk to work
  • 0.4 percent use public transportation
  • 0.2 percent ride a bicycle
  • 2.9 percent work at home

Birmingham

  • Average commute time: 21.2 minutes

Montgomery

  • Average commute time: 18.2 minutes

Mobile

  • Average commute time: 20.4 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Alaska | CarMax

Alaska

Car ownership per household in Alaska is slightly higher than the national average for owning one vehicle, and then slightly lower than the national average for owning two or more cars.

  • 4.8 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 21.8 percent have one vehicle
  • 40.9 percent have two cars
  • 20.1 percent have three cars
  • 12.4 percent of Alaska households have four or more cars

Statewide, Alaska workers have an average daily commute time of 17.6 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.7 percent of Alaska workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 69.5 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 12 percent of the Alaska workforce carpool
  • 8 percent walk to work
  • 13 percent use public transportation
  • 0.9 percent ride a bicycle
  • 3.9 percent work at home

Anchorage 

  • Average commute time: 17.7 minutes

Juneau       

  • Average commute time14.4 minutes

Fairbanks

  • Average commute time: 12.5 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Arizona | CarMax

Arizona

Car ownership per household in Arizona is slightly higher than the national average for owning one car or less, and then slightly lower than the national average for owning three or more cars.

  • 3.1 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 22.8 percent have one vehicle
  • 43.4 percent have two cars
  • 20.5 percent have three cars
  • 10.2 percent of Arizona households have four or more cars

Statewide, Arizona workers have an average daily commute time of 23.1 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.6 percent of Arizona workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 76.9 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 10.4 percent of the Arizona workforce carpool
  • 2 percent walk to work
  • 2 percent use public transportation
  • 1.1 percent ride a bicycle
  • 5.7 percent work at home

Phoenix Metro

  • Average commute time: 23.8 minutes

Tucson

  • Average commute time: 21.5 minutes

Flagstaff

  • Average commute time: 14.8 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Arkansas | CarMax

Arkansas

Car ownership per household in Arkansas is slightly lower than the national average for owning one car or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for two or three vehicles.

  • 2.5 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 20.8 percent have one vehicle
  • 44.3 percent have two cars
  • 21.7 percent have three cars
  • 10.7 percent of Arkansas households have four or more cars

Statewide, Arkansas workers have an average daily commute time of 21 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.8 percent of Arkansas workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 82.5 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 10.9 percent of the Arkansas workforce carpool
  • 1.8 percent walk to work
  • 0.3 percent use public transportation
  • 0.2 percent ride a bicycle
  • 3.3 percent work at home

Little Rock

  • Average commute time: 17.7 minutes

Fort Smith 

  • Average commute time: 14.7 minutes

Fayetteville

  • Average commute time: 17.6 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: California | CarMax

California

Car ownership per household in California is lower than the national average for owning two or fewer vehicles, and then slightly higher than the national average for three or more cars.

  • 3.5 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 19.7 percent have one vehicle
  • 39.3 percent have two cars
  • 21 percent have three cars
  • 15.6 percent of California households have four or more cars

Statewide, California workers have an average daily commute time of 26.6 minutes, which is longer than the national average. Nearly 3.4 percent of California workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 73.5 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 10.5 percent of the California workforce carpool
  • 2.7 percent walk to work
  • 5.3 percent use public transportation
  • 1.2 percent ride a bicycle
  • 5.4 percent work at home

Los Angeles

  • Average commute time: 28.5 minutes

San Diego

  • Average commute time: 21.9

San Jose

  • Average commute time: 26.6
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Colorado | CarMax

Colorado

Car ownership per household in Colorado is slightly lower than the national average for owning one car or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for two or more cars.

  • 2.3 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 21.3 percent have one vehicle
  • 43 percent have two cars
  • 22.3 percent have three cars
  • 13 percent of Colorado households have four or more cars

Statewide, Colorado workers have an average daily commute time of 23.5 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 2 percent of Colorado workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 75.6 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 9.6 percent of the Colorado workforce carpool
  • 2.7 percent walk to work
  • 3.3 percent use public transportation
  • 1.3 percent ride a bicycle
  • 6.5 percent work at home

Denver

  • Average commute time: 23.4

Colorado Springs

  • Average commute time: 20.7

Aurora

  • Average commute time: 28.7
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Connecticut | CarMax

Connecticut

Car ownership per household in Connecticut is slightly lower than the national average for owning one car or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for three or more cars.

  • 3.5 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 20 percent have one vehicle
  • 42.4 percent have two cars
  • 21.8 percent have three cars
  • 12.3 percent of Connecticut households have four or more cars

Statewide, Connecticut workers have an average daily commute time of 24.2 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 3 percent of Connecticut workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 78.1 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 8.1 percent of the Connecticut workforce carpool
  • 3.1 percent walk to work
  • 4.8 percent use public transportation
  • 0.3 percent ride a bicycle
  • 4.6 percent work at home

Bridgeport 

  • Average commute time: 26.5 minutes

New Haven

  • Average commute time: 21.1 minutes

Stamford

  • Average commute time: 24.5 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Delaware | CarMax

Delaware

Car ownership per household in Delaware is about even with the national average for car ownership.

  • 2.3 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 21.7 percent have one vehicle
  • 41.3 percent have two cars
  • 22.3 percent have three cars
  • 11.4 percent of Delaware households have four or more cars

Statewide, Delaware workers have an average daily commute time of 23.5 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 2.3 percent of Delaware workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 81.5 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 7.6 percent of the Delaware workforce carpool
  • 2.2 percent walk to work
  • 2.9 percent use public transportation
  • 0.2 percent ride a bicycle
  • 4.4 percent work at home

Wilmington

  • Average commute time: 20.5 minutes

Dover

  • Average commute time: 19.9

Newark

  • Average commute time: 21.7
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Florida | CarMax

Florida

Car ownership per household in Florida is higher than the national average for owning one or two cars, and then slightly lower than the national average for three or more cars.

  • 3.2 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 24.4 percent have one vehicle
  • 45.4 percent have two cars
  • 18.7 percent have three cars
  • 8.3 percent of Florida households have four or more cars

Statewide, Florida workers have an average daily commute time of 25 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 2 percent of Florida workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 79.7 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 9.1 percent of the Florida workforce carpool
  • 1.4 percent walk to work
  • 2.1 percent use public transportation
  • 0.7 percent ride a bicycle
  • 5.4 percent work at home

Jacksonville

  • Average commute time: 22.9 minutes

Miami         

  • Average commute time: 26.7 minutes

Tampa

  • Average commute time: 22.8 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Georgia | CarMax

Georgia

Car ownership per household in Georgia is about equal with the national average.

  • 3.3 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 21.9 percent have one vehicle
  • 42.1 percent have two cars
  • 21 percent have three cars
  • 11.9 percent of Georgia households have four or more cars

Statewide, Georgia workers have an average daily commute time of 26.2 minutes, which is longer than the national average. Only 2.7 percent of Georgia workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 79.6 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 10.1 percent of the Georgia workforce carpool
  • 1.6 percent walk to work
  • 2.1 percent use public transportation
  • 0.2 percent ride a bicycle
  • 5 percent work at home

Atlanta

  • Average commute time: 25 minutes

Columbus  

  • Average commute time: 17.5 minutes

Augusta

  • Average commute time: 22.5 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Hawaii | CarMax

Hawaii

Car ownership per household in Hawaii is about equal with the national average for the first vehicle owned, and then slightly lower than the national average for two or three cars.

  • 3.4 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 21.4 percent have one vehicle
  • 36.8 percent have two cars
  • 20.8 percent have three cars
  • 18 percent of Hawaii households have four or more cars

Statewide, Hawaii workers have an average daily commute time of 26.7 minutes, which is longer than the national average. More than 3.1 percent of Hawaii workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 66.4 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 13.5 percent of the Hawaii workforce carpool
  • 4.7 percent walk to work
  • 7.2 percent use public transportation
  • 1.1 percent ride a bicycle
  • 4.5 percent work at home

<h4> Honolulu

  • Average commute time: 22.9 minutes

Hilo

  • Average commute time: 16.6 minutes

Kailua

  • Average commute time: 26.5 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Idaho | CarMax

Idaho

Car ownership per household in Idaho is slightly lower than the national average for the first two vehicles, and then slightly higher than the national average for three or more cars.

  • 2 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 20.2 percent have one vehicle
  • 40.6 percent have two cars
  • 23.3 percent have three cars
  • 13.9 percent of Idaho households have four or more cars

Statewide, Idaho workers have an average daily commute time of 19.1 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.5 percent of Idaho workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 78.9 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 9.8 percent of the Idaho workforce carpool
  • 2.2 percent walk to work
  • 0.8 percent use public transportation
  • 1.2 percent ride a bicycle
  • 6.2 percent work at home

Boise

  • Average commute time: 17.2 minutes

Nampa

  • Average commute time: 22.2 minutes

Meridian

  • Average commute time: 21 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Illinois | CarMax

Illinois

Car ownership per household in Illinois is slightly higher than the national average for the first two vehicles, and then slightly lower than the national average for three or more cars.

  • 5.2 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 23.1 percent have one vehicle
  • 41.6 percent have two cars
  • 19.4 percent have three cars
  • 10.7 percent of Illinois households have four or more cars

Statewide, Illinois workers have an average daily commute time of 27.4 minutes, which is longer than the national average. About 2.9 percent of Illinois workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 73.4 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 9.4 percent of the Illinois workforce carpool
  • 3.1 percent walk to work
  • 8 percent use public transportation
  • 0.2 percent ride a bicycle
  • 2.9 percent work at home

Chicago     

  • Average commute time: 33.4 minutes

Aurora       

  • Average commute time: 28.1 minutes

Rockford

Average commute time: 19 minutes

Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Indiana | CarMax

Indiana

Car ownership per household in Indiana is slightly less than the national average for owning one car or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for owning two or more cars.

  • 3 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 19.7 percent have one vehicle
  • 42.5 percent have two cars
  • 22 percent have three cars
  • 12.9 percent of Indiana households have four or more cars

Statewide, Indiana workers have an average daily commute time of 22.5 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.8 percent of Indiana workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 83.2 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 9 percent of the Indiana workforce carpool
  • 2 percent walk to work
  • 1.1 percent use public transportation
  • 0.4 percent ride a bicycle
  • 3.4 percent work at home

Indianapolis

  • Average commute time: 22.3 minutes

Fort Wayne

  • Average commute time: 19.7 minutes

Evansville

  • Average commute time: 17.8 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Iowa | CarMax

Iowa

Car ownership per household in Iowa is slightly lower than the national average for owning one car or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for owning two or more cars.

  • 2.1 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 17.9 percent have one vehicle
  • 42.4 percent have two cars
  • 23.4 percent have three cars
  • 14.2 percent of Iowa households have four or more cars

Statewide, Iowa workers have an average daily commute time of 17.9 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.2 percent of Iowa workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 80.8 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 8.6 percent of the Iowa workforce carpool
  • 3.4 percent walk to work
  • 1 percent use public transportation
  • 0.5 percent ride a bicycle
  • 4.8 percent work at home

Des Moines

  • Average commute time: 18.1 minutes

Cedar Rapids

  • Average commute time: 17 minutes

Davenport

  • Average commute time: 17.2 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Kansas | CarMax

Kansas

Car ownership per household in Kansas is slightly lower than the national average for owning one car or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for owning two or more cars.

  • 1.9 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 18.4 percent have one vehicle
  • 41.8 percent have two cars
  • 23.3 percent have three cars
  • 14.5 percent of Kansas households have four or more cars

Statewide, Kansas workers have an average daily commute time of 18.5 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.2 percent of Kansas workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 82.1 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 9.5 percent of the Kansas workforce carpool
  • 2.5 percent walk to work
  • 0.5 percent use public transportation
  • 0.3 percent ride a bicycle
  • 4 percent work at home

Wichita      

  • Average commute time: 17.7 minutes

Overland Park

  • Average commute time: 19.6 minutes   

Kansas City

  • Average commute time: 21 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Kentucky | CarMax

Kentucky

Car ownership per household in Kentucky is slightly lower than the national average for owning one car or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for owning two or more cars.

  • 2.9 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 20.8 percent have one vehicle
  • 42.2 percent have two cars
  • 22 percent have three cars
  • 12.1 percent of Kentucky households have four or more cars

Statewide, Kentucky workers have an average daily commute time of 22.2 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.8 percent of Kentucky workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 81.9 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 10 percent of the Kentucky workforce carpool
  • 2.4 percent walk to work
  • 1.1 percent use public transportation
  • 0.3 percent ride a bicycle
  • 3.2 percent work at home

Louisville   

  • Average commute time: 21.7 minutes

Lexington  

  • Average commute time: 19.8 minutes

Bowling Green

  • Average commute time: 15.4 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Louisiana | CarMax

Louisiana

Car ownership per household in Louisiana is slightly higher than the national average for the first two vehicles, and then slightly lower than the national average for three or more cars.

  • 2 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 20.2 percent have one vehicle
  • 40.6 percent have two cars
  • 23.3 percent have three cars
  • 13.9 percent of Louisiana households have four or more cars

Statewide, Louisiana workers have an average daily commute time of 24.7 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. More than 3.3 percent of Louisiana workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 82.2 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 9.8 percent of the Louisiana workforce carpool
  • 1.9 percent walk to work
  • 1.4 percent use public transportation
  • 0.5 percent ride a bicycle
  • 2.6 percent work at home

New Orleans

  • Average commute time: 22.2 minutes

Baton Rouge

  • Average commute time: 20.5 minutes

Shreveport

  • Average commute time: 18.7 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Maine | CarMax

Maine

Car ownership per household in Maine is slightly lower than the national average for owning one car or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for or two or three cars.

  • 2.5 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 19.4 percent have one vehicle
  • 45.9 percent have two cars
  • 21.2 percent have three cars
  • 11 percent of Maine households have four or more cars

Statewide, Maine workers have an average daily commute time of 22.6 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 2.3 percent of Maine workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 79.7 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 8.7 percent of the Maine workforce carpool
  • 3.8 percent walk to work
  • 0.6 percent use public transportation
  • 0.3 percent ride a bicycle
  • 5.7 percent work at home

Portland    

  • Average commute time: 17.4 minutes

Lewiston    

  • Average commute time: 19.4 minutes

Bangor

  • Average commute time: 14.1 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Maryland | CarMax

Maryland

Car ownership per household in Maryland is about equal to the national average.

  • 4.2 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 20.8 percent have one vehicle
  • 41 percent have two cars
  • 20.4 percent have three cars
  • 13.6 percent of Maryland households have four or more cars

Statewide, Maryland workers have an average daily commute time of 31.1 minutes, which is longer than the national average. Roughly 4.4 percent of Maryland workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 73.8 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 8.9 percent of the Maryland workforce carpool
  • 2.6 percent walk to work
  • 9 percent use public transportation
  • 0.3 percent ride a bicycle
  • 4.4 percent work at home

Baltimore  

  • Average commute time: 30.4 minutes

Columbia   

  • Average commute time: 29.2 minutes

Germantown

  • Average commute time: 35.3 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Massachusetts | CarMax

Massachusetts

Car ownership per household in Massachusetts is slightly higher than the national average for the first two vehicles, and then slightly lower than the national average for three or more cars.

  • 6.2 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 24 percent have one vehicle
  • 42.2 percent have two cars
  • 18.1 percent have three cars
  • 13.9 percent of Massachusetts households have four or more cars

Statewide, Massachusetts workers have an average daily commute time of 28.3 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. About 3.4 percent of Massachusetts workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 70.2 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 10.6 percent of the Massachusetts workforce carpool
  • 5 percent walk to work
  • 7.4 percent use public transportation
  • 0.8 percent ride a bicycle
  • 4.8 percent work at home

Boston

  • Average commute time: 30.5 minutes

Worcester

  • Average commute time: 22.8

Springfield

  • Average commute time: 21.1 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Michigan | CarMax

Michigan

Car ownership per household in Michigan is slightly lower than the national average for owning one car or less, and then about equal to the national average for owning two or more cars.

  • 2.8 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 20.4 percent have one vehicle
  • 43.5 percent have two cars
  • 21.2 percent have three cars
  • 12.1 percent of Michigan households have four or more cars

Statewide, Michigan workers have an average daily commute time of 23.5 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.8 percent of Michigan workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 82.8 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 8.7 percent of the Michigan workforce carpool
  • 2.3 percent walk to work
  • 1.3 percent use public transportation
  • 0.4 percent ride a bicycle
  • 2.6 percent work at home

Detroit

  • Average commute time: 24.9 minutes

Grand Rapids      

  • Average commute time: 18.9 minutes

Warren

  • Average commute time: 24.1 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Minnesota | CarMax

Minnesota

Car ownership per household in Minnesota is slightly lower than the national average for owning one car or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for owning two or more cars.

  • 2.6 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 17.8 percent have one vehicle
  • 43.6 percent have two cars
  • 22.8 percent have three cars
  • 13.1 percent of Minnesota households have four or more cars

Statewide, Minnesota workers have an average daily commute time of 22.1 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.6 percent of Minnesota workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 78.1 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 8.3 percent of the Minnesota workforce carpool
  • 2.7 percent walk to work
  • 3.6 percent use public transportation
  • 0.9 percent ride a bicycle
  • 5.5 percent work at home

Minneapolis

  • Average commute time: 21.7 minutes

Saint Paul  

  • Average commute time: 23.2 minutes

Rochester

  • Average commute time: 15.6 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Mississippi | CarMax

Mississippi

Car ownership per household in Mississippi is slightly lower than the national average for owning two cars or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for owning three or more cars.

  • 2.4 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 20 percent have one vehicle
  • 40. percent have two cars
  • 23.2 percent have three cars
  • 14.5 percent of Mississippi households have four or more cars

Statewide, Mississippi workers have an average daily commute time of 23.8 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 2.6 percent of Mississippi workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 85.4 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 9.2 percent of the Mississippi workforce carpool
  • 1.5 percent walk to work
  • 0.3 percent use public transportation
  • 0.2 percent ride a bicycle
  • 2.1 percent work at home

Jackson     

  • Average commute time: 19.6 minutes

Gulfport     

  • Average commute time: 20.6 minutes

Southaven

  • Average commute time: 21.8
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Missouri | CarMax

Missouri

Car ownership per household in Missouri is slightly lower than the national average for owning two cars or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for owning three or more cars.

  • 2.8 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 20.1 percent have one vehicle
  • 42.6 percent have two cars
  • 21.4 percent have three cars
  • 13 percent of Missouri households have four or more cars

Statewide, Missouri workers have an average daily commute time of 22.5 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.8 percent of Missouri workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 81.8 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 8.7 percent of the Missouri workforce carpool
  • 1.9 percent walk to work
  • 1.6 percent use public transportation
  • 0.2 percent ride a bicycle
  • 4.8 percent work at home

Kansas City

  • Average commute time: 20.6 minutes

Saint Louis

  • Average commute time: 23 minutes      

Springfield

  • Average commute time: 16.6 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Montana | CarMax

Montana

Car ownership per household in Montana is slightly lower than the national average for owning two vehicles or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for three or more cars.

  • 2.2 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 16.8 percent have one vehicle
  • 41.1 percent have two cars
  • 25.1 percent have three cars
  • 16.6 percent of Montana households have four or more cars

Statewide, Montana workers have an average daily commute time of 16.9 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.6 percent of Montana workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 74.5 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 10.4 percent of the Montana workforce carpool
  • 5.6 percent walk to work
  • 0.8 percent use public transportation
  • 1.6 percent ride a bicycle
  • 6 percent work at home

Billings      

Average commute time: 16.9 minutes

Missoula    

Average commute time: 14.3 minutes

Great Falls

Average commute time: 13.6 minutes

Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Nebraska | CarMax

Nebraska

Car ownership per household in Nebraska is slightly lower than the national average for owning two vehicles or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for owning three or more cars.

  • 2.2 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 18.2 percent have one vehicle
  • 41.7 percent have two cars
  • 22.6 percent have three cars
  • 15.2 percent of Nebraska households have four or more cars

Statewide, Nebraska workers have an average daily commute time of 17.7 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1 percent of Nebraska workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 82 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 9 percent of the Nebraska workforce carpool
  • 2.8 percent walk to work
  • 0.8 percent use public transportation
  • 0.5 percent ride a bicycle
  • 3.9 percent work at home

Omaha       

  • Average commute time: 18 minutes

Lincoln       

  • Average commute time: 17.3 minutes

Bellevue

  • Average commute time: 20.2 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Nevada | CarMax

Nevada

Car ownership per household in Nevada is about equal with the national average.

  • 3.6 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 23 percent have one vehicle
  • 40.6 percent have two cars
  • 21.1 percent have three cars
  • 11.9 percent of Nevada households have four or more cars

Statewide, Nevada workers have an average daily commute time of 23.3 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 2.1 percent of Nevada workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 77.8 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 10.5 percent of the Nevada workforce carpool
  • 2.2 percent walk to work
  • 3.7 percent use public transportation
  • 0.5 percent ride a bicycle
  • 3.7 percent work at home

Las Vegas  

  • Average commute time: 25.1 minutes

Henderson 

  • Average commute time: 22.4 minutes

Reno

  • Average commute time: 18.7 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: New Hampshire | CarMax

New Hampshire

Car ownership per household in New Hampshire is lower than the national average for owning one vehicle or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for owning two or more cars.

  • 1.8 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 16.2 percent have one vehicle
  • 45.2 percent have two cars
  • 23.8 percent have three cars
  • 14.7 percent of New Hampshire households have four or more cars

Statewide, New Hampshire workers have an average daily commute time of 23.6 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.8 percent of New Hampshire workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 85.9 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 8.6 percent of the New Hampshire workforce carpool
  • 11 percent walk to work
  • 0.4 percent use public transportation
  • 0.2 percent ride a bicycle
  • 2.9 percent work at home

Manchester

  • Average commute time: 22.5 minutes

Nashua      

  • Average commute time: 25.2 minutes

Concord

  • Average commute time: 20.5 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: New Jersey | CarMax

New Jersey

Car ownership per household in New Jersey is lower than the national average, with the exception of households that own exactly one car.

  • 6.5 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 22.9 percent have one vehicle
  • 39.9 percent have two cars
  • 13 percent have three cars
  • 11.6 percent of New Jersey households have four or more cars

Statewide, New Jersey workers have an average daily commute time of 30.1 minutes, which is longer than the national average. Well above the national average, 5.2 percent of New Jersey workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 71.8 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 7.5 percent of the New Jersey workforce carpool
  • 3.3 percent walk to work
  • 11.6 percent use public transportation
  • 0.3 percent ride a bicycle
  • 4.1 percent work at home

Newark      

  • Average commute time: 36.1 minutes

Jersey City

  • Average commute time: 35.1 minutes

Paterson

  • Average commute time: 22.4 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: New Mexico | CarMax

New Mexico

Car ownership per household in New Mexico is slightly lower than the national average for the owning two vehicles or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for three or more cars.

  • 2.1 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 20.4 percent have one vehicle
  • 40.2 percent have two cars
  • 23.3 percent have three cars
  • 14 percent of New Mexico households have four or more cars

Statewide, New Mexico workers have an average daily commute time of 20.7 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.9 percent of New Mexico workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 81.4 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 9 percent of the New Mexico workforce carpool
  • 2.3 percent walk to work
  • 0.9 percent use public transportation
  • 0.6 percent ride a bicycle
  • 4.8 percent work at home

Albuquerque

  • Average commute time: 20 minutes

Las Cruces

  • Average commute time: 18.7 minutes

Rio Rancho

  • Average commute time: 28.2 minutes 
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: New York | CarMax

New York

Car ownership per household in New York is lower than the national average, with the exception of households that own exactly one car.

  • 22.2 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 26.2 percent have one vehicle
  • 30.2 percent have two cars
  • 13.5 percent have three cars
  • 9.7 percent of New York households have four or more cars

Statewide, New York workers have an average daily commute time of 31.8 minutes, which is longer than the national average. Roughly 5.6 percent of New York workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 52.7 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 6.6 percent of the New York workforce carpool
  • 6.3 percent walk to work
  • 28.6 percent use public transportation
  • 0.7 percent ride a bicycle
  • 4 percent work at home

New York City

  • Average commute time: 39.2 minutes

Buffalo       

  • Average commute time: 21.9 minutes

Rochester

  • Average commute time: 19.2 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: North Carolina | CarMax

North Carolina

Car ownership per household in North Carolina is slightly lower than the national average for owning one vehicle or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for owning two or more cars.

  • 2.4 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 20.5 percent have one vehicle
  • 41.9 percent have two cars
  • 22.4 percent have three cars
  • 12.9 percent of North Carolina households have four or more cars

Statewide, North Carolina workers have an average daily commute time of 23 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 2 percent of North Carolina workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 81.4 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 9.1 percent of the North Carolina workforce carpool
  • 1.8 percent walk to work
  • 1.1 percent use public transportation
  • 0.2 percent ride a bicycle
  • 5 percent work at home

Charlotte

  • Average Commute Time: 24.9 minutes

Raleigh

  • Average Commute Time: 21.8 minutes

Greensboro

  • Average Commute Time: 19.7 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: North Dakota | CarMax

North Dakota

Car ownership per household in North Dakota is lower than the national average for households that own one car or less, about at the national average for owning two cars, and then slightly higher than the national average for three or more cars.

  • 1.8 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 17.8 percent have one vehicle
  • 40.9 percent have two cars
  • 22.5 percent have three cars
  • 17.1 percent of North Dakota households have four or more cars

Statewide, North Dakota workers have an average daily commute time of 15.9 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.8 percent of North Dakota workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 82 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 8.6 percent of the North Dakota workforce carpool
  • 3.8 percent walk to work
  • 0.4 percent use public transportation
  • 0.2 percent ride a bicycle
  • 4.5 percent work at home

Fargo

  • Average commute time: 15 minutes

Bismarck   

  • Average commute time: 16.1 minutes

Grand Forks

  • Average commute time: 12.4 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Ohio | CarMax

Ohio

Car ownership per household in Ohio is slightly lower than the national average for owning one vehicle or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for owning two or more cars.

  • 3.1 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 20.2 percent have one vehicle
  • 42.7 percent have two cars
  • 21.4 percent have three cars
  • 12.5 percent of Ohio households have four or more cars

Statewide, Ohio workers have an average daily commute time of 22.5 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.7 percent of Ohio workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 83.2 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 7.8 percent of the Ohio workforce carpool
  • 2.4 percent walk to work
  • 1.8 percent use public transportation
  • 0.2 percent ride a bicycle
  • 3.7 percent work at home

Columbus  

  • Average commute time: 21 minutes.

Cleveland  

  • Average commute time: 24.2 minutes

Cincinnati

  • Average commute time: 22 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Oklahoma | CarMax

Oklahoma

Car ownership per household in Oklahoma is slightly lower than the national average for owning one car or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for owning two or more cars.

  • 2.2 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 20.1 percent have one vehicle
  • 43.7 percent have two cars
  • 21.7 percent have three cars
  • 12.3 percent of Oklahoma households have four or more cars

Statewide, Oklahoma workers have an average daily commute time of 20.6 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.6 percent of Oklahoma workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 82.5 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 10.2 percent of the Oklahoma workforce carpool
  •  1.7 percent walk to work
  •  0.4 percent use public transportation
  •  0.7 percent ride a bicycle
  •  3.7 percent work at home

Oklahoma City     

  • Average commute time: 20.4 minutes

Tulsa

  • Average commute time: 17.7 minutes

Norman

  • Average commute time: 21.3 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Oregon | CarMax

Oregon

Car ownership per household in Oregon is slightly lower than the national average for not owning a car, but otherwise the ownership values are about equal to national averages.

  • 3.9 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 21.3 percent have one vehicle
  • 40.7 percent have two cars
  • 21.9 percent have three cars
  • 12.2 percent of Oregon households have four or more cars

Statewide, Oregon workers have an average daily commute time of 22.1 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.8 percent of Oregon workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 71.2 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 10.2 percent of the Oregon workforce carpool
  • 3.8 percent walk to work
  • 4.8 percent use public transportation
  • 2.5 percent ride a bicycle
  • 6.3 percent work at home

Portland    

  • Average commute time: 24.2 minutes

Salem        

  • Average commute time: 20.5 minutes

Eugene

  • Average commute time: 16.6 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Pennsylvania | CarMax

Pennsylvania

Car ownership per household in Pennsylvania is slightly higher than the national average for owning two vehicles or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for three or more cars.

  • 5.2 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 21.2 percent have one vehicle
  • 42 percent have two cars
  • 20.3 percent have three cars
  • 11.3 percent of Pennsylvania households have four or more cars

Statewide, Pennsylvania workers have an average daily commute time of 25.2 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 2.9 percent of Pennsylvania workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 76.3 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 8.5 percent of the Pennsylvania workforce carpool
  • 3.9 percent walk to work
  • 5.7 percent use public transportation
  • 0.5 percent ride a bicycle
  • 4.2 percent work at home

Philadelphia

  • Average commute time: 32 minutes

Pittsburgh 

  • Average commute time: 22.5 minutes

Allentown

  • Average commute time: 23.2 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Rhode Island | CarMax

Rhode Island

Car ownership per household in Rhode Island is slightly higher than the national average for owning two vehicles or less, and then slightly lower than the national average for owning no car or three or more cars.

  • 3.8 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 23 percent have one vehicle
  • 42.9 percent have two cars
  • 19.6 percent have three cars
  • 10.6 percent of Rhode Island households have four or more cars

Statewide, Rhode Island workers have an average daily commute time of 23.9 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Rhode Island workers meet the 2.8 percent national average for workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 79 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 9.7 percent of the Rhode Island workforce carpool
  • 3.7 percent walk to work
  • 2.9 percent use public transportation
  • 0.4 percent ride a bicycle
  • 3.3 percent work at home

Providence

  • Average commute time: 21.2 minutes

Warwick    

  • Average commute time: 23.3 minutes

Cranston

  • Average commute time: 21.4 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: South Carolina | CarMax

South Carolina

Car ownership per household in South Carolina is slightly lower than the national average for owning one car or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for two or more cars.

  • 2.5 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 20.8 percent have one vehicle
  • 42.3 percent have two cars
  • 22.9 percent have three cars
  • 11.5 percent of South Carolina households have four or more cars

Statewide, South Carolina workers have an average daily commute time of 23.6 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.8 percent of South Carolina workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 83 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 9.3 percent of the South Carolina workforce carpool
  • 2 percent walk to work
  • 0.3 percent use public transportation
  • 0.2 percent ride a bicycle
  • 3.8 percent work at home

Columbia   

  • Average commute time: 14.5 minutes

Charleston 

  • Average commute time: 20.6 minutes

North Charleston

  • Average commute time: 21.9
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: South Dakota | CarMax

South Dakota

Car ownership per household in South Dakota is lower than the national average for the owning two vehicles or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for three or more cars.

  • 1.8 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 16.3 percent have one vehicle
  • 38.5 percent have two cars
  • 25.7 percent have three cars
  • 17.6 percent of South Dakota households have four or more cars

Statewide, South Dakota workers have an average daily commute time of 15.9 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.3 percent of South Dakota workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 80.6 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 8.4 percent of the South Dakota workforce carpool
  • 3.1 percent walk to work
  • 0.8 percent use public transportation
  • 0.6 percent ride a bicycle
  • 5.8 percent work at home

Sioux Falls

  • Average commute time: 16.3 minutes

Rapid City

  • Average commute time: 15 minutes

Aberdeen

  • Average commute time: 11 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Tennessee | CarMax

Tennessee

Car ownership per household in Tennessee is slightly lower than the national average for the owning one car or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for owning two or more cars.

  • 2 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 19.7 percent have one vehicle
  • 42.3 percent have two cars
  • 22.5 percent have three cars
  • 13.6 percent of Tennessee households have four or more cars

Statewide, Tennessee workers have an average daily commute time of 23.9 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.7 percent of Tennessee workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 83.9 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 9 percent of the Tennessee workforce carpool
  • 1.2 percent walk to work
  • 0.8 percent use public transportation
  • 0.1 percent ride a bicycle
  • 3.8 percent work at home

Memphis    

  • Average commute time: 20.8 minutes

Nashville   

  • Average commute time: 24.1 minutes

Knoxville

  • Average commute time: 19.1 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Texas | CarMax

Texas

Car ownership per household in Texas is slightly higher than the national average.

  • 2.2 percent of Texas households don’t have a car
  • 21.5 percent have one vehicle
  • 42.9 percent have two cars
  • 21.8 percent have three cars
  • 11.4 percent of Texas households have four or more cars

Statewide, Texas workers have an average daily commute time of 25.1 minutes, which about equal to the national average. Only 2.4 percent of Texas workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 80.8 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 10.2 percent of the Texas workforce carpool
  • 1.6 percent walk to work
  • 1.5 percent use public transportation
  • 0.2 percent ride a bicycle
  • 4.4 percent work at home

Houston

  • Average commute time: 26.3 minutes

San Antonio

  • Average commute time: 23.8 minutes

Dallas

  • Average commute time: 25.6 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Utah | CarMax

Utah

Car ownership per household in Utah is lower than the national average for the owning two vehicles or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for three or more cars.

  • 1.8 percent of Utah households don’t have a car
  • 14.3 percent have one vehicle
  • 40.5 percent have two cars
  • 24.6 percent have three cars
  • 18.8 percent of Utah households have four or more cars

Statewide, Utah workers have an average daily commute time of 20.1 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.5 percent of Utah workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 75.8 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 11.2 percent of the Utah workforce carpool
  • 2.8 percent walk to work
  • 2.7 percent use public transportation
  • 1 percent ride a bicycle
  • 5.5 percent work at home

Salt Lake City      

  • Average commute time: 18.9 minutes

West Valley City

  • Average commute time: 21.3 minutes

Provo

  • Average commute time: 16.8 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Vermont | CarMax

 Vermont

Car ownership per household in Vermont is slightly higher than the national average for households that own two cars, and then lower than the national average for households with one car and households with three or more cars.  

  • 2.6 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 20 percent have one vehicle
  • 46.3 percent have two cars
  • 20 percent have three cars
  • 11.1 percent of Vermont households have four or more cars

Statewide, Vermont workers have an average daily commute time of 21.6 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.7 percent of Vermont workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 76.9 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 8.2 percent of the Vermont workforce carpool
  • 5.8 percent walk to work
  • 1.3 percent use public transportation
  • 0.8 percent ride a bicycle
  • 6.1 percent work at home

Burlington 

  • Average commute time:16.8 minutes

Essex

  • Average commute time: 24.4 minutes

South Burlington

  • Average commute time: 15.5 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Virginia | CarMax

Virginia

Car ownership per household in Virginia is slightly lower than the national average for the owning two vehicles or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for three or more cars.

  • 2.7 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 19.6 percent have one vehicle
  • 40.4 percent have two cars
  • 22.7 percent have three cars
  • 14.6 percent of Virginia households have four or more cars

Statewide, Virginia workers have an average daily commute time of 26.9 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 3 percent of Virginia workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 77.5 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 9.1 percent of the Virginia workforce carpool
  • 2.3 percent walk to work
  • 4.7 percent use public transportation
  • 0.4 percent ride a bicycle
  • 4.6 percent work at home

Virginia Beach     

  • Average commute time: 23.3 minutes

Norfolk      

  • Average commute time: 20.8

Chesapeake

  • Average commute time: 24.2
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Washington | CarMax

Washington

Car ownership per household in Washington is slightly lower than the national average for the owning two vehicles or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for three or more cars.

  • 2.8 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 19.6 percent have one vehicle
  • 40.6 percent have two cars
  • 22.4 percent have three cars
  • 14.5 percent of Washington households have four or more cars

Statewide, Washington workers have an average daily commute time of 25.5 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 3 percent of Washington workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 72.4 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 9.8 percent of the Washington workforce carpool
  • 3.7 percent walk to work
  • 6.2 percent use public transportation
  • 1 percent ride a bicycle
  • 5.6 percent work at home

Seattle       

  • Average commute time: 25.5 minutes

Spokane

  • Average commute time: 18.7 minutes

Tacoma

  • Average commute time: 25.3 minutes

Ultimate Guide to Commuting: West Virginia | CarMax
West Virginia

Car ownership per household in West Virginia is slightly higher than the national average for the owning one or two vehicles, and then slightly lower than the national average for three or more cars.

  • 3.1 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 22.4 percent have one vehicle
  • 42.7 percent have two cars
  • 20.3 percent have three cars
  • 11.3 percent of West Virginia households have four or more cars

Statewide, West Virginia workers have an average daily commute time of 24.7 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Almost 3.4 percent of West Virginia workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 82.7 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 8.7 percent of the West Virginia workforce carpool
  • 2.7 percent walk to work
  • 1.1 percent use public transportation
  • 0.2 percent ride a bicycle
  • 3.2 percent work at home

Charleston 

  • Average commute time: 15.9

Huntington

  • Average commute time: 16.9

Parkersburg

  • Average commute time: 17.7
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Wisconsin | CarMax

Wisconsin

Car ownership per household in Wisconsin is slightly higher than the national average for the owning two or three vehicles, and then slightly lower than the national average for owning one car or three or more cars.

  • 2.8 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 18.2 percent have one vehicle
  • 44.8 percent have two cars
  • 22.9 percent have three cars
  • 12.3 percent of Wisconsin households have four or more cars

Statewide, Wisconsin workers have an average daily commute time of 21.1 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 1.6 percent of Wisconsin workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 81.2 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 7.9 percent of the Wisconsin workforce carpool
  • 3.2 percent walk to work
  • 1.9 percent use public transportation
  • 0.8 percent ride a bicycle
  • 4.1 percent work at home

Milwaukee 

  • Average commute time: 21.7 minutes

Madison     

  • Average commute time: 18.5 minutes

Green Bay

  • Average commute time:18.3 minutes
Ultimate Guide to Commuting: Wyoming | CarMax

Wyoming

Car ownership per household in Wyoming is lower than the national average for the owning two vehicles or less, and then slightly higher than the national average for having three or more cars.

  • 1.2 percent of households don’t have a car
  • 17.7 percent have one vehicle
  • 38.7 percent have two cars
  • 25.9 percent have three cars
  • 16.4 percent of Wyoming households have four or more cars

Statewide, Wyoming workers have an average daily commute time of 18.2 minutes, which is shorter than the national average. Only 3.5 percent of Wyoming workers have a “super commute,” a term that represents a travel time of 90-plus minutes.

  • 77.3 percent of the working population drive alone
  • 10 percent of the Wyoming workforce carpool
  • 4.6 percent walk to work
  • 2.2 percent use public transportation
  • 0.6 percent ride a bicycle
  • 4.2 percent work at home

Cheyenne  

  • Average commute time:  13.4 minutes

Casper       

  • Average commute time:16.4 minutes

Laramie

  • Average commute time: 11.4 minutes 
05

How to Best Use Your Daily Commute

Everyone approaches commuting differently. Some people absolutely love their alone time in the car. Other people find their daily travels heap on unwanted anxiety and stress. They’re anxious about bumper-to-bumper traffic, worried about arriving at work on time, and find that commuting makes them grumpy.

For many of us, long daily commutes are an unavoidable part of life. And these commutes can take a negative toll on your health over time. So what can we do about all of the stress factors and negative health consequences? Use the time commuting to pursue goals, enrich your life, and create a relaxing atmosphere for yourself. Also, don’t forget to take care of your physical, mental, and spiritual health before, during, and after your commute.

Here are 10 great ways to improve your daily commute.

1. Bring healthy snacks

Ultimate Guide to Commuting | CarMax
Unexpected traffic jams are the pitfalls of a pleasant, timely commute. And worst of all, they tend to happen when you’re hungriest. But don’t fear. Now is an excellent opportunity to treat yourself to a light, healthy snack.

The foods you choose should be easy to carry and simple to eat on the road. This means you can eat and handle the snack with one hand and not risk dropping or spilling your food while you maintain proper control over the car. Aim for a treat with high protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals, but low sugar contents. (This eliminates some granola bars, candy, chips, and fast food.) And to maintain your car’s resale value (in case of a spill), you’ll also want to avoid greasy, sticky, super-juicy, liquid, or super-smelly foods when possible.

Here are a few of our favorite snacks while driving:

  • Dehydrated fruits like banana slices or apricots
  • Whole-food recommended granola or nut bars
  • Packets of assorted nuts and seeds
  • Rice cakes
  • Popcorn

And if you travel with a small cooler…

  • Sliced fruit and veggies
  • Hardboiled eggs
  • String cheese
  • Bottled water

Don’t forget to keep a plastic bag for trash and tidy up any wrappers to keep seats and floors neat and clean.

2. Reflect on your daily goals

Successful people begin their days by establishing the tasks they want to complete by the end of that day. This simple tip can slash away at procrastination and push you further toward achieving your goals.

For example, on your drive, make a mental review of the calls you need to make or who you need to see as soon as you settle in at the office. Remind yourself of appointments or meetings you need to attend later in the day. Have a mantra you use to inspire your work? Use the time behind the wheel to say it to yourself so you walk into work calm, prepared, and glad to meet the day.

3. Know the best route

Ultimate Guide to Commuting | CarMax
If we were all very lucky, our daily commutes would be uneventful. We’d be able to maintain the same schedule and route every morning, which would reduce a lot of potential commuting stress. 

Because commutes come with elements of unpredictability, the heart rate and blood pressure of a daily commuter exceeds that of pilots and police officers in training exercises, according to research by the International Stress Management Association.

So how can you add a level of comfort and certainty to your morning and evening commutes?

Before you pull out of your driveway or office lot, check the traffic reports along your daily path. Some apps provide very accurate time estimates and highlight any areas where traffic moves at a snail’s pace. Use these reports to consider alternate routes for the day. Once you have a handle on the time commitment your commute is going to require, you can better prepare for how you want to spend that time. If you leave early and then slow down and take extra time, you can better react to the unexpected circumstances that pop up during your commute, without increasing your stress levels.

Also, don’t forget to plan for any stops along the way: refueling, picking up carpoolers, or swinging by the store on the way home.

4.  Practice mindfulness during your commute

A daily commute can be an excellent opportunity to take 25 minutes and create a relaxing oasis that lets you decompress between obligations. Consider practicing mindfulness during your travels, whether you’re simply doing a breathing exercise, progressive relaxation, or following a guided meditation. Just keep your eyes on the road as you do!

  • Mindfulness Breathing Exercise:
    • Start by noticing and relaxing your body.
    • Concentrate on the sensations you experience: the touch of the steering wheel, the sounds of traffic, etc.
    • Recognize and silently acknowledge any areas of physical or emotional tension or discomfort. Focus on those tight and tense spots, and then breathe into them.
    • Tune into the natural flow of each breath; notice the sensation of air flowing in and out of your nostrils and mouth.
    • If your mind wanders, acknowledge it and bring your attention back to your breath.
    • After 10 minutes of mindful breathing, rescan your body to see if how it is doing and if there are any missed spots of tension.
    • Repeat the breathing exercise until your commute is done. Before you get out of the car, take a moment to thank yourself for taking this time to listen to what your body needs, and set a positive mood for the next part of your day.
  • Progressive Relaxation Exercise:
    • This is a simple exercise where you give yourself a tension massage. Choose a part of your body and focus on slowly tensing and then relaxing each muscle group in that area.
    • Alternate between tension and relaxation every 30 seconds for each muscle group. This practice teaches you the difference between muscle tension and relaxation; when we’re often stressed or in high-pressure situations, like driving, it becomes difficult to tell how relaxed or tense your body truly is.
    • The most common way to start progressive muscle relaxation is by tensing and relaxing the muscles in your toes. Afterward, move upward into your calves and then your thighs and glutes. Keep progressing until you’ve worked up to your neck and head. If you still feel stress, you can always repeat the exercise beginning with your head and neck and working down to your toes.

Regardless of what options you choose, the goal is to be present, in the moment, and aware of what is going on around — and in — you.

5. Practice proper driving posture

You read about the importance of adjustable seats at the start of this article.  If you do any of the following, then you may need to revisit the position of your driver’s seat:

  • Head tilted forward
  • Rounded shoulders
  • Rounded upper back
  • Rounded lower back
  • Pelvis slouched

Proper posture can help prevent headaches, shoulder pain, neck pain, and back pain. Plus, keeping proper posture while you drive lets you maximize your field of view and the car’s comfort features.

Here’s how to you set up your seat to practice proper driving posture:

  • Sit in your seat and “scoot” it all the way back. Then, move the seat forward so you can reach and completely press the gas, brake, and clutch pedals while your legs remain slightly bent.
  • Next, tilt the seatback forward until you’re reclined at a 100 to 110-degree angle, which decreases the pressure on your lower back. Make sure the headrest is behind the middle of your head. Afterward, adjust the lumbar support for evenly-dispersed pressure at the small of your back.
  • If your car has the option to angle the seat itself, or raise and lower it, tilt the seat cushion until it evenly supports your legs without applying pressure or hitting the back of your knees.
  • Now you’ll want to readjust the seat belt to fit your new position.
  • Last, double check your mirrors to make sure they’re properly positioned.

Remember to keep your hands in the 9 o’clock and 3 o’clock positions (10 and 2 is now considered outdated advice) to let your shoulders, neck, and back properly relax — and to keep your arms out of the way of the airbag should it deploy in an accident.

6. Relax with aromatherapy

Smell has a profound effect on our bodies and our mental and emotional states. Particular smells evoke moods and unconscious responses. If you happen to get anxious during your daily commutes — or even driving in general — then consider practicing aromatherapy.

If you’re looking for great scent to start with, consider installing a lavender oil-scented plugin. Lavender has been shown to keep anxiety at bay and even improve attention spans during lengthy tasks, such as extended drives.

If you want to stay sharp on the road but lavender doesn’t suit your fancy, you can also try peppermint or rosemary, which have been shown to improve attentiveness in clerical tasks and math problems respectively.

When you’re choosing a scent, the key chemical ingredient you want is linalool, which has a calming effect. Some oils that contain linalool include:

  • Lemon
  • Lavender
  • Basil
  • Oranges
  • Jasmine
  • Laurel
  • Cinnamon
  • Rosewood
  • Mint

Car aromatherapy diffusers that plug into your accessory outlet are the best way to distribute whichever scent you choose.

7. Learn something new

Ultimate Guide to Commuting | CarMax
Long commutes allow you to transform tedious, mostly unusable time into 30 (or so) minutes of fascinating, enriching time.

A car is the perfect place for that, thanks to audiobooks, podcasts, and foreign language apps.

If you have a specialty trade, listening to relevant audio books or podcasts is an excellent way to learn something new or keep up with industry trends. Another option is using a free newspaper reading app, such as Instapaper, which can read aloud any online news articles you find and queue up.

If you want to get your language skills back on track, or start them off, download or stream foreign language audio lessons. Your local library is an excellent place to look for educational CDs.

If you want something less brain-intensive than learning a new language, an audiobook may be your best bet. Amazon, Audible, and iTunes have plenty of options for you to choose from. If you want to save money on audiobooks, or just give them a trial run, then you should check out BooksShouldBeFree. It’s a free online database of public domain audio books. Your local library is also a good option for narrated novels and biographies.

Last, interesting podcasts cover nearly any topic you can think of.

8. Change your shoes or outfit

Your commute should signify a distinct break from work and home life. Sometimes something simple, such as swapping out of work clothes and into your casual attire, can let your brain know that the workday stress is over. In fact, a good pair of driving shoes aren’t just comfortable — they can save your car’s mats or carpet from holes incurred from years of heeled shoes.

9. Stretch in your seat or before that long drive

If you’re stuck sitting down at the office most of the day, your body will thank you for a short break before you plop back down in the driver’s seat. Consider taking five minutes to walk around and stretch your chest, shoulders, and hip flexors. Those muscles get tight throughout your workday and they’re often used in a commute.

In case you notice you’re feeling sluggish during the commute and stretching isn’t helping, another option is to do a brief workout before or directly after work. Even a simple, five-minute routine will limber you up and give your body a well-deserved break.

And you can always stretch while you sit during gridlock traffic. What should the stretch sit feel like? There should be a subtle pulling sensation throughout the spine. It should feel like someone is gently elongating and stretching your spine as you sit tall.

10. Declutter your emails by voice

Knowing you have a towering, virtual stack of unread emails waiting for you at work can fill your morning commute with dread. However, it can feel good to take care of those emails during your commute instead of taking up valuable time away from accomplishing the daily goals you’ve set.

While you're driving to work, consider using a free text-to-speech email reader. These apps will read your emails out loud, and even give you an opportunity to dictate and send a reply.